EL MUSEO DEL BARRIO PRESENTS THE ILLUSIVE EYE— AN INTERNATIONAL SURVEY OF KINETIC AND OP ART

EL MUSEO DEL BARRIO PRESENTS THE ILLUSIVE EYE— AN INTERNATIONAL SURVEY OF KINETIC AND OP ART

El Museo del Barrio

“The Illusive Eye is about illusions—those we see and feel when we look at Op and kinetic art and those experienced by the curators and art historians of these movements,” said Jorge Daniel Veneciano, Executive Director, El Museo and exhibition curator. “The perceptual play of things seen and unseen provides us with a model for understanding the relative invisibility of Latin American artists in past surveys of Op art.”

EL MUSEO DEL BARRIO PRESENTS THE ILLUSIVE EYE— AN INTERNATIONAL SURVEY OF KINETIC AND OP ART, El Museo del Barrio, February 2, 2016

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Heritage Muine- KIAF Seoul 2017

Heritage Muine – KIAF Seoul 2017

Heritage Muine 

An article covering of Puerta Roja’s booth at KIAF 2017, featuring Carlos Cruz-Diez, Carlos Aguirre, Javier León Pérez, María García-Ibáñez, Ventoso and Laurent Martin ‘Lo’.

Puerta Roja at KIAF Seoul 2017, Heritage Muine, October 2017

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Toys for Boys – Carlos Cruz-Diez

10 must-see exhibitions in Hong Kong this December

Lifestyle Asia 

Puerta Roja exhibition, Weightless Matter, presenting the works of Gladys Nistor was selected as a must see exhibition in Hong Kong.

10 must-see exhibitions in Hong Kong this December, Lifestyle Asia, 2017

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The Rise of Latin American Art – Beyond Cliches

THE RISE OF LATIN AMERICAN ART – BEYOND CLICHES

Christie Lee

“People usually associate Latin American art with its socialist-realist agenda, but more and more people are paying attention to other movements that arose during the mid-20th century, including Geometric Abstraction,” says Dana Bramham, Latin American Art Specialist at Christie’s. She points to Carmen Herrera, the Havana-born, New York-based artist known for her formal simplicity. “She worked all the way from the 1950’s and up, but she’s only getting noticed now.”

Another example if Franco-Venezualan Cruz-Diez, touted as the founder of kinetic and op art. For his Physichromie (1959) series, vertical coloured bands are arranged according to strict mathematical principal, resulting in an optical illusion, so that the image shifts as the position of the viewer changes.

“If you look at a Diego Rivera mural that references a specific moment in time, be it in Mexico or the states, you are going to lose something if you are not aware of that historical background. But there were plenty of artists who weren’t looking into tying their works to a specific history. Cruz-Diez is a good example, as his work is about activiating the viewer. It’s something universal.”

Alvarez-Nichol, who mounted a well received solo show of the artist at Art Basel 2017, adds, “Even though the artist started producin in the 50’s, it is really the experience of the works, which only exist in the present, that is the most important aspect of the work. In a way, this interactive aspect has a lot to do with what the youths are facing today. No longer content to be on the receiving end, they want to be relevant. The ideas that gave birth to kinetic and optical art are still very much relevant today.”

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Puerta Roja at KIAF Seoul 2017

Puerta Roja at KIAF Seoul 2017

Noblesse

An article covering Puerta Roja’s booth at KIAF 2017, featuring Carlos Cruz-Diez, Laurent Martin ‘Lo’ and Carlos Aguirre.

Puerta Roja at KIAF Seoul 2017, Noblesse, September 2017

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Carlos Cruz-Diez’s dazzle ship is unveiled at Liverpool dock

Carlos Cruz-Diez’s dazzle ship is unveiled at Liverpool dock

Stephanie Straine, Tate

An article about abstract art and their relation to First World War camouflage techniques in light of the unveiling of Carlos Cruz-Diez’s Dazzle Ship.

Stephanie Straine, Carlos Cruz-Diez’s dazzle ship is unveiled at Liverpool dock, Tate, London 2014

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Radical Geometry: Modern Art of South America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection, Royal Academy of Art, London

Radical Geometry: Modern Art of South America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection, Royal Academy of Art, London

Aesthetica Magazine

Radical Geometry: Modern Art of South America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection, Royal Academy of Art, LondonAesthetica Magazine, 2014

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Beyond the Easel

Beyond the Easel

Tate Etc.

“Tate Etc: Could you describe how Physichromie No. 123 was actually made? You invented a special machine to create it…

Carlos Cruz-Diez: That was the happy result of an accident. I produced Physichromie No. 123 in 1963, using materials that were available at the time – cardboard strips with coloured edges, with which I built the Chromatic Event Modules, and exterior sheets of a rather fragile reflective material called Lumaline that I placed between each module. One day a heavy box of packing material fell on the work and reduced it to rubble; it stayed like that in the workshop for years. When I started using aluminium U-shaped sections instead of cardboard or PVC strips, I returned to the project and rebuilt it, replacing the fragile Lumaline with sheets of highly polished stainless steel that were like mirrors. All my works are produced according to a plan and then coded – thus eliminating all romantic traces of the artist’s hand – so they can be reconstructed should they deteriorate over time. We know that many of the materials that artists use today are perishable, so, as a precaution, I record the construction specifics and the colour codes of all my works in a log that is kept in the archives of the Cruz-Diez Workshop and the Cruz-Diez Foundation. My works are built by hand in a slow, complex process requiring tools that are sometimes simply not available. I have, therefore, had to design many of the devices I need for each stage of the assembly, such as a section folder with rollers, several presses for silkscreen printing, a number of dyes…

Tate Etc.: What was your intention behind the creation of the Physichromie series of works? You have talked about the ‘aim to project colour from line into space’.

Carlos Cruz-Diez: The series is the result of a great deal of time spent thinking about the concept of colour in painting. We were, it seemed to me, in the grip of a millennial stagnation and were still in thrall to this concept. If colour in nature appears before our eyes as a mutating event that colours the space we inhabit and exists in a constant state of change, why does painting treat it like an absolute event and transform it into something that the artist places on a plane by applying brush to canvas? Might it be possible to create the same pleasure that colour stimulates by making colour express itself in all its surprising mutations, behaving exactly as it does in reality? If the space we inhabit is coloured, why insist on enclosing colour in a static, two-dimensional support? Colour should fully occupy its environment, which is space. The solution expressed in Physichromie No. 123 was the result of the thinking, the experiments, and the successes and failures that began in Caracas in 1954.”

Beyond the Easel, Tate Etc., issue 24, spring 2012

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Carlos Cruz-Diez’s Physichromie 21

Carlos Cruz-Diez’s Physichromie 21

Anne Umland, Post

“Physichromie 21 by Venezuelan artist Carlos Cruz-Diez is another highlight of the recent Cisneros’ gift to the Museum. Anne Umland, the Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Curator of Painting and Sculpture, traces this work back to the artist’s studio in Paris in the 1960s and explores the ways Cruz-Diez’s Physichromie series is dependent on active viewer participation and contingencies of lighting.”

Anne Umland , Carlos Cruz-Diez’s Physichromie 21, Post, 2016

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